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Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):199-206.

Marijuana use and the risk of Major Depressive Episode. Epidemiological evidence from the United States National Comorbidity Survey.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This is an epidemiological study of a possible causal role of marijuana use in the development of Major Depressive Episode (MDE). Male-female differences in the suspected causal association have also been studied.

METHOD:

Data are from 6,792 National Comorbidity Survey participants aged 15-45 years, assessed via the University of Michigan modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI). Survival analysis methods were used to estimate cumulative risk of MDE by levels of marijuana use and to estimate suspected causal associations after adjustment for other influences.

RESULTS:

The risk of first MDE was moderately associated with the number of occasions of marijuana use and with more advanced stages of marijuana use. Relative to never users, non-dependent marijuana users had 1.6 times greater risk of MDE (95 % Confidence Interval: 1.1, 2.2), even with statistical adjustment for sex, birth cohorts, alcohol dependence, and history of daily tobacco smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was male-female variation in the degree of association between stage of marijuana involvement and MDE, but the strength of the association is modest at best.

PMID:
12107710
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-002-0541-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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