Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Matern Child Health J. 2002 Jun;6(2):99-105.

Differing postneonatal mortality rates of African-American and white infants in Chicago: an ecologic study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois 60614, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to determine whether neighborhood impoverishment explains the racial disparity in urban postneonatal mortality rates.

METHODS:

Stratified and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed on the vital records of all African-Americans and whites born in Chicago by means of a linked 1992-1995 computerized birth-death file with appended 1990 U.S. census income and 1995 Chicago Department of Public Health data. Four community-level variables (low median family income, high rates of unemployment, homicide, and lead poisoning) were analyzed. Communities with one or more ecologic risk factors were classified as impoverished.

RESULTS:

The postneonatal mortality rate of African-Americans (N = 104,656) was 7.5/1000 compared to 2.7/1000 for whites (N = 52,954); relative risk (95% confidence interval) equaled 2.8 (2.3-3.3). Seventy-nine percent of African-American infants compared to 9% of white infants resided in impoverished neighborhoods; p < 0.01. In impoverished neighborhoods, the adjusted odds ratio (controlling for infant and maternal individual-level risk factors) of postneonatal mortality for African-American infants equaled 1.5 (0.5-4.2). In nonimpoverished neighborhoods, the adjusted odds ratio of postneonatal mortality for African-American infants equaled 1.8 (1.1-2.9).

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that urban African-American infants who reside in nonimpoverished neighborhoods are at high risk for postneonatal mortality.

PMID:
12092986
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center