Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pulm Pharmacol Ther. 2002;15(2):147-55.

Adenosine-mediated bronchoconstriction and lung inflammation in an allergic mouse model.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Brody school of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA.

Abstract

In this study, we studied the role of adenosine on airway responsiveness and airway inflammation using an allergic mouse model. Mice were sensitized by two i.p. injections of ragweed and three consecutive ragweed aerosol challenges. It was found that inhalation of adenosine causes a dose-related bronchoconstriction in this model. Ragweed sensitized and challenged mice showed increased sensitivity to airway challenge to adenosine compared to control animals. Theophylline, a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, blocked adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, but was unable to inhibit bronchoconstrictor response to methacholine. Mice systemically sensitized and airway challenged with allergen showed a marked airway inflammation manifesting increases in eosinophils, lymphocytes and neutrophils, and decrease in macrophages. Twenty-four hours after airway challenge with allergen, aerosolization of adenosine further potentiated the allergen-induced airway inflammation. Cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after adenosine aerosolization increased by 3.07-fold as compared to control mice, and by 1.8-fold compared to ragweed sensitized and challenged mice. The increases in eosinophils, lymphocytes, and neutrophils caused by allergen were potentiated after adenosine challenge. Unexpectedly, macrophages significantly decreased after adenosine challenge. Theophylline attenuated adenosine-enhanced airway inflammation, but could not reverse allergen-induced airway inflammation. These findings suggested that specific adenosine receptors contribute to airway responsiveness and airway inflammation associated with this model of allergic asthma.

PMID:
12090788
DOI:
10.1006/pupt.2001.0329
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center