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J Anim Sci. 2002 Jun;80(6):1606-15.

The effects of dietary fat sources, levels, and feeding intervals on pork fatty acid composition.

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1
Department of Animal Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh 27695, USA.

Abstract

Two experiments investigated the quantitative relationship between dietary fat and fatty acid composition of pork. Experiment 1 was designed to establish the rate of decline for linoleic acid and iodine value of pork fat during the late fattening phase following a dietary reduction. Gilts (n = 288) were fed diets varying in linoleic acid content from 4.11 to 1.56% for 4, 6, or 8 wk prior to slaughter. The maximum rate of decline was 2% 18:2 per week and 2.5 iodine value units per week. Experiment 2 evaluated the effects of dietary fat source and level on carcass fatty acid composition and on pork quality characteristics. Barrows (n = 147) and gilts (n = 147) were allocated to seven dietary treatments for the last 6 wk of the finishing phase. Diets contained 0, 2.5, or 5% dietary fat comprised of 100, 50, or 0% beef tallow. The balance was provided by animal-vegetable blended fat. As the level of tallow increased there was a linear decrease (P < 0.05) in 18:2 content and iodine value of carcass fat. Conversely, 16:1 and 18:1 increased linearly (P < 0.05) as tallow increased. However, 16:1 decreased linearly (P < 0.05) as level of fat increased. As the level of tallow was increased a greater reduction in 18:2 and iodine value was observed in diets with 5% dietary fat compared to diets with 2.5% fat (P < 0.05). These results indicate that reduction of dietary PUFA content had the desired effect of lowering 18:2 content and iodine value of pork fat and that significant alterations could be elicited in as little as 6 to 8 wk of feeding.

PMID:
12078742
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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