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Eur J Public Health. 2002 Jun;12(2):94-8.

Decentralization of the DOTS programme within a Russian penitentiary system. How to ensure the continuity of tuberculosis treatment in pre-trial detention centres.

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1
Department of Epidemiology and International Health, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Kemerovo region (Siberia), three pre-trial detention centres (SIZO; Ministry of Justice) serve as the gateway to the penitentiary system, comprised of 23 prisons and 30,000 detainees. The follow-up for tuberculosis (TB) patients released into civil society is unreliable. Due to varying detention times and frequent transfers to temporary detention centres (IVS; Ministry of Internal Affairs) for investigation and trial, and concerns about continuity of treatment, SIZOs were not included in the revised TB control programme initiated during 1996.

METHODS:

To investigate the feasibility of DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy, Short-Course) expansion into SIZOs, general detainee release was studied by examining 10% of files from detainees admitted during 1998 (SIZOs 1,2,3). Then, 5% of general files from SIZO 1 were examined to determine SIZO-IVS flow; 224 TB patient files from SIZO 3 were evaluated to determine the pattern of release/transfer.

RESULTS:

TB patients in SIZO 3 have less chance of release before six months of detention than non-TB detainees (14/224, 6.3% versus 774/2276, 34%; p < 0.001). Among detainees not released, 60% are not moved during the first six months of detention. For those who move, the mean stay in IVS was 9.5 (+/- 6) days. The incidence of active disease detected upon entry to SIZO 3 was 4,560/100,000, the subsequent rate during the same year of detention 880/100,000.

CONCLUSION:

Despite frequent detainee movements between institutions, DOTS should be introduced into the earliest stages of detention to prevent case mismanagement, and links to the civilian programme should be developed.

PMID:
12073760
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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