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Oncogene. 2002 Jun 6;21(25):4020-31.

G-protein alpha(olf) subunit promotes cellular invasion, survival, and neuroendocrine differentiation in digestive and urogenital epithelial cells.

Author information

1
INSERM U482, Signal transduction and cellular functions in Diabetes and Digestive Cancers, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, 75571 Paris Cedex 12, France.

Abstract

The heterotrimeric G-protein subunits Galpha and Gbetagamma are involved in cellular transformation and tumor development. Here, we report the expression of Galpha(olf) in human digestive and urogenital epithelial cells using RT-PCR and Western blot. When the constitutively activated form of Galpha(olf)Q214L (AGalpha(olf)) was stably transfected in canine kidney MDCKts.src and human colonic HCT-8/S11 epithelial cells, it induced cellular invasion in collagen gels. AGalpha(olf)-mediated invasion was abrogated by agonists of platelet activating factor receptors (PAF-R) and protease-activated receptors -1 (PAR-1), pharmacological inhibitors of PI3'-Kinase (wortmannin), protein kinase C (Gö6976 and GF109203X), Rho GTPase (C3T exoenzyme), but was independent of protein kinase A. Accordingly, the invasive phenotype induced by AGalpha(olf) in HCT-8/S11 cells was reversed by the RhoA antagonist RhoD (G26V). Although AGalpha(olf) protected MDCKts.src cells against serum starvation-mediated apoptosis via a Rho-independent pathway, both AGalpha(olf) and Rho inhibition by C3T induced neuroendocrine-like differentiation linked to extensive neurite outgrowth and parathyroid hormone-related protein expression in human prostatic LNCaP-AGalpha(olf) cells. Since prostate tumors with a larger neuroendocrine cell population display increased invasiveness, persistent activation of the G-protein alpha(olf) may exert convergent adverse effects on cellular invasion and survival in solid tumors during the neoplastic progression towards metastasis. doi:10.1038/sj.onc.1205498.

PMID:
12037684
DOI:
10.1038/sj.onc.1205498
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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