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Am J Public Health. 2002 Jun;92(6):1007-12.

Smoking among Chinese Americans: behavior, knowledge, and beliefs.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA. eyu@mail.sdsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This report describes and examines factors significantly associated with smoking among Chinese Americans, using multiple logistic regression methods.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based survey (n = 644, age = 40-69 years) in Chicago's Chinatown using a Chinese questionnaire based on the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

RESULTS:

Smoking prevalence was 34% for males and 2% for females. Some 93% of current smokers had smoked regularly for 10 or more years. Low education (odds ratio [OR] = 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31, 4.46), use of a non-Western physician or clinic for health care (OR = 2.64; 95% CI = 1.46, 4.80), and no knowledge of early cancer warning signs and symptoms (OR = 2.52; 95% CI = 1.35, 4.70) were significantly associated with smoking among men.

CONCLUSIONS:

The male prevalence of smoking is higher than those reported in California, the NHIS, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); exceeds the rate for African Americans aged 18 years and older; is comparable with the rate for African American males aged 45 to 64 years; and is far above the Healthy People 2010 target goal of less than 12%. Multisite surveys and smoking cessation campaigns in Chinese are needed.

PMID:
12036797
PMCID:
PMC1447502
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.92.6.1007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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