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Health Psychol. 2002 May;21(3):254-62.

Discovering how urban poverty and violence affect health: development and validation of a Neighborhood Stress Index.

Author information

1
Center for Health and Behavior, Syracuse University, New York 13244-2340, USA. cewart@psych.syr.edu

Erratum in

  • Health Psychol. 2002 Sep;21(5):458..

Abstract

Health problems of the urban poor have been attributed to psychosocial effects of environmental stress. Testing such models requires an ability to measure neighborhood characteristics that make life stressful. The City Stress Inventory (CSI) uses self-report to assess perceived neighborhood disorder and exposure to violence. Data from an interracial sample of urban adolescents show the CSI to be internally consistent, stable, and correlated with census indices of social disadvantage. Validity for stress research is indicated by correlations with trait depression, anger, hostility, self-esteem, and mood changes during a debate with an unfamiliar peer. The CSI can be completed by persons with an 8th-grade education.

PMID:
12027031
DOI:
10.1037//0278-6133.21.3.254
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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