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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2002 May;186(5):899-902.

Diagnosing postpartum depression: can we do better?

Author information

1
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga 30303, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale versus routine clinical evaluation to detect postpartum depression among a low-income inner-city population and to evaluate risk factors associated with a positive score on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

STUDY DESIGN:

On the basis of the day of the month, all English-speaking patients who were seen for their postpartum visit were assigned either to routine clinical evaluation for postpartum depression or routine clinical evaluation plus the use of the 10-question Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

RESULTS:

During the 7-week study period, 72 women participated in the study: 35 women in the routine evaluation group and 37 women in the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale group. Women who completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale were significantly more likely than those in the routine evaluation group to be identified as being at risk for depression: 11 of 37 women (30%) versus 0 of 35 women (P <.001). A failed attempt at breast-feeding was associated with an increased risk of a score of > or =10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (relative risk, 3.78; 95% CI, 1.03-13.89).

CONCLUSION:

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale appears to be a valuable and efficient tool for the identification of patients who are at risk for postpartum depression.

PMID:
12015507
DOI:
10.1067/mob.2002.123404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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