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Arthroscopy. 2002 May-Jun;18(5):488-91.

Quantifying glenoid bone loss arthroscopically in shoulder instability.

Author information

1
Baylor College of Medicine, The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Our goal was to establish a consistent methodology for quantifying glenoid bone loss by arthroscopic means.

TYPE OF STUDY:

This study was an anatomic investigation of glenoid structure and its consistent anatomic landmarks as determined by arthroscopic means in live subjects and by direct measurement in fresh-frozen cadaver specimens.

METHODS:

We arthroscopically evaluated and measured the location of the bare spot of the glenoid in 56 subjects that had no evidence of instability (average age, 40 years). We also measured the exact location of the glenoid bare spot in 10 cadaver shoulders (average age, 76 years).

RESULTS:

The bare spot of the glenoid was a consistent reference point from which to determine glenoid bone loss because it was located almost exactly at the center of the circle that was defined by the articular margin of the inferior glenoid below the level of the midglenoid notch. The tightly clustered standard deviations of the bare spot measurements in both the live subjects and the cadaver specimens confirmed its consistent location.

CONCLUSIONS:

The glenoid bare spot can be used as a central reference point to quantify the percentage bone loss of the inferior glenoid. Such objective measurement of glenoid bone loss can be clinically useful to the surgeon in deciding whether bone grafting is necessary to restore stability to the shoulder with a bone-deficient glenoid.

PMID:
11987058
DOI:
10.1053/jars.2002.32212
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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