Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2002 May;25(5):822-8.

Five-week, low-glycemic index diet decreases total fat mass and improves plasma lipid profile in moderately overweight nondiabetic men.

Author information

1
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) Unit 341, Department of Diabetes, AP Hôtel-Dieu Hospital, Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate whether a 5-week low-glycemic index (LGI) diet versus a high-glycemic index (HGI) diet can modify glucose and lipid metabolism as well as total fat mass in nondiabetic men.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

In this study, 11 healthy men were randomly allocated to 5 weeks of an LGI or HGI diet separated by a 5-week washout interval in a crossover design.

RESULTS:

The LGI diet resulted in lower postprandial plasma glucose and insulin profiles and areas under the curve (AUCs) than the HGI diet. A 5-week period of the LGI diet lowered plasma triacylglycerol excursion after lunch (AUC, P < 0.05 LGI vs. HGI). These modifications were associated with a decrease in the total fat mass by approximately 700 g (P < 0.05) and a tendency to increase lean body mass (P < 0.07) without any change in body weight. This decrease in fat mass was accompanied by a decrease in leptin, lipoprotein lipase, and hormone-sensitive lipase RNAm quantities in the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

We concluded that 5 weeks of an LGI diet ameliorates some plasma lipid parameters, decreases total fat mass, and tends to increase lean body mass without changing body weight. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in the expression of some genes implicated in lipid metabolism. Such a diet could be of benefit to healthy, slightly overweight subjects and might play a role in the prevention of metabolic diseases and their cardiovascular complications.

PMID:
11978675
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center