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Biophys J. 2002 May;82(5):2580-91.

Tropomyosin requires an intact N-terminal coiled coil to interact with tropomodulin.

Author information

1
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-5635, USA. greenfie@rwja.umdnj.edu

Abstract

Tropomodulins (Tmods) are tropomyosin (TM) binding proteins that bind to the pointed end of actin filaments and modulate thin filament dynamics. They bind to the N termini of both "long" TMs (with the N terminus encoded by exon 1a of the alpha-TM gene) and "short" nonmuscle TMs (with the N terminus encoded by exon 1b). In this present study, circular dichroism was used to study the interaction of two designed chimeric proteins, AcTM1aZip and AcTM1bZip, containing the N terminus of a long or a short TM, respectively, with protein fragments containing residues 1 to 130 of erythrocyte or skeletal muscle Tmod. The binding of either TMZip causes similar conformational changes in both Tmod fragments promoting increases in both alpha-helix and beta-structure, although they differ in binding affinity. The circular dichroism changes in the Tmod upon binding and modeling of the Tmod sequences suggest that the interface between TM and Tmod includes a three- or four-stranded coiled coil. An intact coiled coil at the N terminus of the TMs is essential for Tmod binding, as modifications that disrupt the N-terminal helix, such as removal of the N-terminal acetyl group from AcTM1aZip or striated muscle alpha-TM, or introduction of a mutation that causes nemaline myopathy, Met-8-Arg, into AcTM1aZip destroyed Tmod binding.

PMID:
11964245
PMCID:
PMC1302047
DOI:
10.1016/S0006-3495(02)75600-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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