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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2002 Feb 18;1560(1-2):25-36.

Interference of serum with lipoplex-cell interaction: modulation of intracellular processing.

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1
University of Groningen, Department of Membrane Cell Biology, The Netherlands.

Abstract

We have investigated the mechanism of lipoplex-mediated transfection, employing a dialkyl pyridinium surfactant (SAINT-2), and using serum as a modulator of complex stability and processing. Particle size and stability determine lipoplex internalization, the kinetics of intracellular processing, and transfection efficiency. Clustered SAINT-2 lipoplexes are obtained in the absence of serum (-FBS lipoplexes), but not in its presence (+FBS lipoplexes), or when serum was present during lipoplex formation [FBS], conditions that mimic potential penetration of serum proteins. The topology of DNA in [FBS] lipoplexes shifts from a supercoiled, as in -FBS lipoplexes, to a predominantly open-circular conformation, and is more prone to digestion by DNase. Consistently, atomic force microscopy revealed complexes with tubular extensions, reflecting DNA that protrudes from the lipoplex surface. Interestingly, the internalization of [FBS] lipoplexes is approximately three-fold higher than that of -FBS and +FBS lipoplexes, yet their transfection efficiency is approximately five-fold lower. Moreover, in contrast to -FBS and +FBS complexes, [FBS] complexes were rapidly processed into the late endosomal/lysosomal degradation pathway. Intriguingly, transfection by [FBS] complexes is greatly improved by osmotic rupture of endocytic compartments. Our data imply that constraints in size and morphology govern the complex' ability to interact with and perturb cellular membranes, required for gene release. By extrapolation, we propose that serum may regulate these parameters in an amphiphile-dependent manner, by complex 'penetration' and modulation of DNA conformation.

PMID:
11958773
DOI:
10.1016/s0005-2736(01)00448-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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