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Arthritis Rheum. 2002 Apr 15;47(2):155-65.

Value of laboratory tests in early prediction of rheumatoid arthritis.

Author information

1
Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, Brest, France. Alain.Saraux@univ-brest.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine which laboratory test or tests at presentation best predicted a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 2 years later.

METHODS:

Two hundred seventy patients with early arthritis seen in 7 hospitals underwent comprehensive evaluations at 6-month intervals for 2 years, when the diagnosis of RA was assessed by 5 rheumatologists. The sensitivity and specificity of each test at the first visit for discriminating between RA (38%, n = 98) and non-RA patients were determined. Optimal cutoffs for continuous tests were derived from receiver operating characteristic curves. Sensitivity and specificity of test combinations selected by multiple logistic regression were determined.

RESULTS:

IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, IgG-antikeratin antibody (AKA), and latex test had the strongest associations with RA. These 3 tests formed the most powerful combination for distinguishing RA from non-RA.

CONCLUSION:

IgM-RF, IgG-AKA, and the latex test are the best laboratory tests for discriminating between patients with and without RA. Combining these tests slightly improves diagnostic value.

PMID:
11954009
DOI:
10.1002/art.10241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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