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J Ren Nutr. 2002 Apr;12(2):113-21.

Anthropometric and growth assessment of children receiving renal replacement therapy in Malaysia.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, National University of Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To report on the anthropometric and growth status of children receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Malaysia.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study with some retrospective elements.

SETTING:

Outpatients' clinics in a major referral hospital in Malaysia.

PATIENTS:

Fifteen renal transplants (mean age, 13.3 +/- 2.8 years) and 35 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients (mean age, 12.6 +/- 3.0 years) participated. The RRT period ranged between 3 months to 6 years for both groups.

INTERVENTION:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (% BF), triceps skinfold (TSF), mid upper-arm circumference (MUAC), arm muscle area (AMA), and z scores for height and weight.

RESULTS:

BMI for age indicated 7% of transplant subjects (TS) versus 40% of CAPD subjects were below the 5th percentile, whereas only 7% of TS were above the 95th percentile. % BF was higher for TS compared with the CAPD group for both sexes (boys, 19.5% and girls, 29.8% v boys, 12.4% and girls, 21.5%). Despite higher percentiles for TSF, transplant subjects still showed depleted muscle mass based on MUAC and AMA. z scores for height showed 93% of transplant subjects and 62% of CAPD subjects below -2 standard deviation (SD), whereas for weight these were 27% and 54%, respectively. Sixty-four percent of TS experienced catch-up growth for height and 86% for weight. These percentages were approximately halved for the CAPD group (32% and 43%, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Patterns of growth and body composition appear distinctly different with the different RRT modalities. Serial anthropometric evaluation appears vital in pre- and post-RRT monitoring in pediatric renal populations.

PMID:
11953925
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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