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Diabet Med. 2002 Apr;19(4):317-21.

Post-prandial glucose excursions following four methods of bolus insulin administration in subjects with type 1 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, Barbara Davis Center, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262, USA. Peter.Chase@uchsc.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

To determine if one method of short-acting insulin bolus administration is superior to other methods in managing a meal high in carbohydrates, calories and fat.

METHODS:

Nine subjects receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion using insulin lispro (Humalog) agreed to consume the same meal high in carbohydrates, calories and fat on four occasions 1 week apart. They received the same dose of bolus insulin on each of the four occasions randomly assigned and beginning 10 min prior to the meal as either a single bolus, two separate boluses of one-half the same total dose (the second after 90 min), the entire bolus given as a square-wave (over 2 h) or a dual-wave (70% as a bolus and 30% as a square-wave over 2 h). Blood glucose levels were measured at -60 and -30 min and at zero time, and then every half-hour for 6 h using the Hemacue in the out-patient clinic.

RESULTS:

Changes in blood glucose values from fasting were the lowest after 90 and 120 min (P < 0.01) when the dual wave was administered. When the dual or square-wave methods of insulin administration were used, subjects had significantly lower glucose levels after 4 h in comparison with when the single or double boluses were used (P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that the dual wave provided the most effective method of insulin administration for this meal. The dual- and square-wave therapies resulted in lower glucose levels 4 h after the meal in comparison with the single and double-bolus treatments.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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