Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Science. 2002 Apr 5;296(5565):72-5.

Cooperation and competition between relatives.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK. stu.west@ed.ac.uk

Abstract

Individuals are predicted to behave more altruistically and less competitively toward their relatives, because they share a relatively high proportion of their genes (e.g., one-half for siblings and one-eighth for cousins). Consequently, by helping a relative reproduce, an individual passes its genes to the next generation, increasing their Darwinian fitness. This idea, termed kin selection, has been applied to a wide range of phenomena in systems ranging from replicating molecules to humans. Nevertheless, competition between relatives can reduce, and even totally negate, the kin-selected benefits of altruism toward relatives. Recent theoretical work has clarified the processes and selective forces underlying this effect and has demonstrated the generality of the effect of competition between relatives.

PMID:
11935015
DOI:
10.1126/science.1065507
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center