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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Apr;87(4):1762-7.

Early pregnancy levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein a and the risk of intrauterine growth restriction, premature birth, preeclampsia, and stillbirth.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cambridge University, CB2 2QQ, United Kingdom. gcss2@cam.ac.uk

Abstract

The risk of adverse perinatal outcome among 8839 women recruited to a multicenter, prospective cohort study was related to maternal circulating concentrations of trophoblast-derived proteins at 8-14 wk gestation. Women with a pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in the lowest fifth percentile at 8-14 wk gestation had an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction [adjusted odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.0-4.1], extremely premature delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.5), moderately premature delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.5), preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6-3.3), and stillbirth (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2-11.0). The strengths of the associations were similar when the test was performed before 13 wk gestation or between 13 and 14 wk gestation. In contrast, levels of free beta-human CG, another circulating protein synthesized by the syncytiotrophoblast, were not predictive of later outcome in multivariate analysis. PAPP-A has been identified as a protease specific for IGF binding proteins. We conclude that control of the IGF system in the first and early second trimester trophoblast may have a key role in determining subsequent pregnancy outcome.

PMID:
11932314
DOI:
10.1210/jcem.87.4.8430
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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