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Ophthalmology. 2002 Apr;109(4):712-9.

Long-term visual prognosis of choroidal neovascularization in high myopia: a comparison between age groups.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze visual outcome in highly myopic patients of different age groups with choroidal neovascularization (CNV).

DESIGN:

Retrospective observational case series.

PARTICIPANTS:

We reviewed the medical records of 63 consecutive patients (73 eyes) with myopic CNV. The patient population was divided into two groups according to age at onset of CNV (< or =40 and >40 years old).

INTERVENTION:

Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the patients' medical records.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Visual acuity at least 3 years after CNV diagnosis.

RESULTS:

Group 1 (< or =40 years old) consisted of 22 patients (26 eyes), and group 2 (>40 years old) consisted of 41 patients (47 eyes). Throughout the follow-up period, group 1 retained better visual acuity than group 2. Almost half the patients in group 1 retained a final visual acuity better than 20/40. No significant change occurred in the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) in group 1 during follow-up. Group 2 had worse visual acuity at the initial evaluation than did group 1, and a statistically significant worsening of logMAR was found during the follow-up period. More than half of the patients in group 2 had a final visual acuity less than 20/200. In addition, group 2 had a larger area of CNV, and chorioretinal atrophy was more frequently seen after the regression of CNV than in group 1.

CONCLUSIONS:

The visual prognosis of myopic CNV is influenced by age at onset. The results of this study indicate that patient age at the time of onset of myopic CNV should be considered when determining the therapeutic course.

PMID:
11927428
DOI:
10.1016/s0161-6420(01)01007-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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