Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biol Chem. 2002 Aug 9;277(32):28446-58. Epub 2002 Mar 29.

The conformationally flexible S9-S10 linker region in the core domain of p53 contains a novel MDM2 binding site whose mutation increases ubiquitination of p53 in vivo.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cellular Pathology, The Cancer Research UK Laboratories, The University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.

Abstract

Although the N-terminal BOX-I domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 contains the primary docking site for MDM2, previous studies demonstrated that RNA stabilizes the MDM2.p53 complex using a p53 mutant lacking the BOX-I motif. In vitro assays measuring the specific activity of MDM2 in the ligand-free and RNA-bound state identified a novel MDM2 interaction site in the core domain of p53. As defined using phage-peptide display, the RNA.MDM2 isoform exhibited a notable switch in peptide binding specificity, with enhanced affinity for novel peptide sequences in either p53 or small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-U (snRNP-U) and substantially reduced affinity for the primary p53 binding site in the BOX-I domain. The consensus binding site for the RNA.MDM2 complex within p53 is SGXLLGESXF, which links the S9-S10 beta-sheets flanking the BOX-IV and BOX-V motifs in the core domain and which is a site of reversible conformational flexibility in p53. Mutation of conserved amino acids in the linker at Ser(261) and Leu(264), which bridges the S9-S10 beta-sheets, stimulated p53 activity from reporter templates and increased MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved Phe(270) within the S10 beta-sheet resulted in a mutant p53, which binds more stably to RNA.MDM2 complexes in vitro and which is strikingly hyper-ubiquitinated in vivo. Introducing an Ala(19) mutation into the p53(F270A) protein abolished both RNA.MDM2 complex binding and hyper-ubiquitination in vivo, thus indicating that p53(F270A) protein hyper-ubiquitination depends upon MDM2 binding to its primary site in the BOX-I domain. Together, these data identify a novel MDM2 binding interface within the S9-S10 beta-sheet region of p53 that plays a regulatory role in modulating the rate of MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53 in cells.

PMID:
11925449
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M202296200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center