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Gastroenterology. 2002 Apr;122(4):1088-100.

The type II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor can trigger Ca2+ waves in rat hepatocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8019, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Ca2+ regulates cell functions through signaling patterns such as Ca2+ oscillations and Ca2+ waves. The type I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is thought to support Ca2+ oscillations, whereas the type III inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is thought to initiate Ca2+ waves. The role of the type II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is less clear, because it behaves like the type III inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor at the single-channel level but can support Ca2+ oscillations in intact cells. Because the type II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is the predominant isoform in liver, we examined whether this isoform can trigger Ca2+ waves in hepatocytes.

METHODS:

The expression and distribution of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor isoforms was examined in rat liver by immunoblot and confocal immunofluorescence. The effects of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on Ca2+ signaling were examined in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets by using flash photolysis and time-lapse confocal microscopy.

RESULTS:

The type II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor was concentrated near the canalicular pole in hepatocytes, whereas the type I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor was found elsewhere. Stimulation of hepatocytes with vasopressin or directly with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate induced Ca2+ waves that began in the canalicular region and then spread to the rest of the cell. Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ signals also increased more rapidly in the canalicular region. Hepatocytes did not express the ryanodine receptor, and cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose had no effect on Ca2+ signaling in these cells.

CONCLUSIONS:

The type II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor establishes a pericanalicular trigger zone from which Ca2+ waves originate in hepatocytes.

PMID:
11910359
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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