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Diabetes Obes Metab. 2001 Dec;3(6):410-6.

The effects of intensive glycaemic control on body composition in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, New Zealand. w.bagg@auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

AIM:

To examine the effects of improved glycaemic control over 20 weeks on the type and distribution of weight change in patients with type 2 diabetes who at baseline have poor glycaemic control.

METHODS:

Forty-three patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c > 8.9% were randomised to either intensive glycaemic control (IC) n = 21 or usual glycaemic control (UC) n = 22 for 20 weeks. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess the type and distribution of weight change during the study.

RESULTS:

After 20 weeks HbA1c was significantly lower in patients randomised to IC than UC (HbA1c IC 8.02 +/- 0.25% vs. UC 10.23 +/- 0.23%, p < 0.0001). In the IC group weight increased by 3.2 +/- 0.8 kg after 20 weeks (fat-free mass increased by 1.8 +/- 0.3 kg) compared to 0.02 +/- 0.70 kg in UC (p = 0.003). The gain in total body fat mass comprised trunk fat mass (IC 0.94 +/- 0.5 kg vs. UC 0.04 +/- 0.4 kg, p = 0.18) and peripheral fat mass (total body fat - trunk fat) (IC 0.71 +/- 0.32 kg vs. UC -0.21 +/- 0.28 kg, p = 0.04). Blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations did not change over time in either group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intensive glycaemic control was associated with weight gain which was distributed in similar proportions between the central and peripheral regions and consisted of similar proportions of fat and fat-free mass. Blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations were not adversely affected.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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