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West J Med. 2002 Mar;176(2):92-6.

Helicobacter pylori eradication in dyspeptic primary care patients: a randomized controlled trial of a pharmacy intervention.

Author information

1
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, 3800 North Interstate Ave Portland, OR 97227, USA. victor.j.stevens@kpchr.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of structured adherence counseling by pharmacists on the eradication of Helicobacter pylori when using a standard drug treatment regimen.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled clinical trial.

SETTING:

Nonprofit group-practice health maintenance organization (HMO).

PARTICIPANTS:

HMO primary care providers referred 1,393 adult dyspeptic patients for carbon 14 urea breath testing (UBT).

INTERVENTIONS:

Those whose tests were positive for H pylori (23.3%) were provided a standard antibiotic regimen and randomly assigned to receive either usual-care counseling from a pharmacist or a longer adherence counseling session and a follow-up phone call from the pharmacist during drug treatment. All subjects were given the same 7-day course of omeprazole, bismuth subsalicylate, metronidazole, and tetracycline hydrochloride (OBMT). Dyspepsia symptoms were recorded at baseline and following therapy.

OUTCOMES:

The main outcome was eradication of H pylori as measured by UBT at 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction and dyspepsia symptoms at 3-month follow-up.

RESULTS:

Of the 333 participants randomly assigned to treatment, 90.7% completed the 3-month follow-up UBT and questionnaires. Overall eradication rate with the OBMT regimen was 80.5% with no significant difference in eradication rates between the 2 groups (P=0.98). Conclusions In this study, additional counseling by pharmacists did not affect self-reported adherence to the treatment regimen, eradication rates, or dyspepsia symptoms but did increase patient satisfaction.

PMID:
11897728
PMCID:
PMC1071673
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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