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Early Hum Dev. 2002 Apr;67(1-2):55-9.

Maternal serum urea resistant alkaline phosphatase in Down syndrome pregnancy.

Author information

1
Laboratoire d'Enzymologie, Service Universitaire d'Hématologie, CHU Rangueil, 31403 Toulouse Cedex 4, France. crowte.n@wanadoo.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The normal levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity in maternal serum are virtually the same as those observed in Down syndrome (DS) pregnancies at 14-20 weeks' gestation. Using urea inhibition of AP, we observed an atypical AP isoenzyme in the neutrophils of mothers with trisomy 21 fetuses.

AIM:

To assess the use of urea as a selective inhibitor of serum AP in order to seek a possible diagnostic difference between normal and DS pregnancies.

STUDY DESIGN AND SUBJECTS:

Serum AP samples from 24 DS pregnancies and 204 control cases were examined at 12-22 weeks' gestation with and without 2.5 M urea AP inhibition at 18 degrees C for 2 h. The levels of AP activity obtained without urea and the percentage urea AP inhibition were analyzed in the two groups.

RESULTS:

Without urea treatment, no significant difference of total alkaline phosphatase activity levels was detected between the 204 normal controls and the 24 DS samples. Using 2.5 M urea AP inhibition, after 120 min of exposure at 18 degrees C, the residual activity, as a percentage of initial values of AP, showed significantly higher resistance in the DS samples (> or = 50 IU/l of total AP activity) at 15-22 weeks' gestation. However, at 12-14 weeks (< or = 45 IU/l of total AP activity), no significant difference was found between the DS and control cases.

CONCLUSION:

Serum urea resistant alkaline phosphatase in DS pregnancies showed a significant difference only at 15-22 weeks' gestation, compared with normal controls.

PMID:
11893436
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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