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Atherosclerosis. 2002 Apr;161(2):293-9.

Statins inhibit A beta-neurotoxicity in vitro and A beta-induced vasoconstriction and inflammation in rat aortae.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, The Roskamp Institute, University of South Florida, 3515 E. Fletcher Avenue, Tampa, FL 33613, USA. dparis@hsc.usf.edu

Abstract

Freshly solubilized A beta peptides synergistically increase the magnitude of the constriction induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1), via the activation of a pro-inflammatory pathway. We report that mevinolin and mevastatin, two inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase are able to completely abolish the vasoactive properties of A beta in rat aortae. Mevinolin also appears to oppose the increased vascular reactivity to ET-1 induced by interleukin 1-beta and phospholipase A(2) suggesting that statins display some anti-inflammatory properties. We show that freshly solubilized A beta stimulates prostaglandin E(2) and F(2 alpha) production (by 6 and 3.6 times, respectively) in isolated rat aortae and that mevinolin completely antagonizes this effect confirming the anti-inflammatory action of mevinolin ex vivo in rat aortae. In addition, we observed that A beta vasoactivity is not mediated nor modulated by mevalonic acid suggesting that the anti-inflammatory action of the statins are not related to an inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity. Differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (IMR32) were used to assess the neurotoxic effect of pre-aggregated A beta by quantifying the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the cell culture medium. A beta appears to enhance LDH release by 30% in IMR32 cells, an effect that can be completely opposed by mevastatin. Taken together these data show that statins can antagonize the effect of A beta in different assays and provide new clues to understand the prophylactic action of the statins against Alzheimer's disease.

PMID:
11888511
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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