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Man Ther. 2002 Feb;7(1):10-8.

A survey to examine attitudes and patterns of practice of physiotherapists who perform cervical spine manipulation.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

As part of the process of developing a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on cervical spine manipulation (CSM), a working group sent out an 82-item postal survey to 150 randomly selected Ontario physiotherapists (PTs) who perform spinal manipulation, to collect information on the socio-demographics, practices, opinions of risk, and attitudes towards CPGs of these PTs (n = 118; response rate = 79%). Of the 118 respondents who performed spinal manipulation, 41 performed CSM. Respondents strongly agreed with three out of six indications listed in the survey for applying CSM: segmental fixation, stiff but stable joint, internal derangement (over 70%). Respondents also strongly agreed (over 88%) that all screening tests listed in the survey should be performed prior to applying CSM: tests for irritability, stability, vascular and neurological systems. Respondents rated patient education, other manual therapy, and exercise as the most common adjuncts to CSM (over 88%). Respondents reported seeing mild complications or side effects only rarely following the application of CSM. Fourteen percent of respondents reported having a written CSM policy or CPG on CSM in their work setting. Feedback from this survey will be used in developing a CSM CPG. A future survey will evaluate changes in clinical practice and in attitudes toward CPGs some time after the dissemination of the CSM CPG.

PMID:
11884151
DOI:
10.1054/math.2001.0430
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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