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BMC Dermatol. 2002;2:3. Epub 2002 Feb 11.

Plasma proteins in a standardised skin mini-erosion (I): permeability changes as a function of time.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. svedmans@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A standardised technique using a suction-induced mini-erosion that allows serial sampling of dermal interstitial fluid (IF) for 5 to 6 days has been described. In the present study, we studied permeability changes as a function of time.

METHODS:

We examined IF concentrations of total protein concentration and the concentration of insulin (6.6 kDa), prealbumin (55 kDa), albumin (66 kDa), transferrin (80 kDa), IgG (150 kDa) and alpha-2-macroglobulin (720 kDa) as a function of time, using an extraction pressure of 200 mmHg below atmospheric.

RESULTS:

At 0 h after forming the erosion, mean total IF protein content (relative to plasma) was 26 +/- 13% (SD). For the individual proteins, the relative mean concentrations were 65 +/- 36% for insulin, 48 +/- 12% for albumin, 30 +/- 19% for transferrin, 31 +/- 15%for IgG and 19.5 +/- 10% for alpha-2-macroglobulin. At 24 h, the total IF protein content was higher than at 0 h (56 +/- 26% vs 26 +/- 13%; p < 0.05, diff: 115%), as were some of the individual protein concentrations: prealbumin (50 +/- 24 vs 25 +/- 13%; p < 0.05), albumin (68 +/- 21 vs 48 +/- 12%; p < 0.05) and IgG (55 +/- 30 vs 31 +/- 15%; p = 0.05). ln the interval 24 h to 96 h the concentrations were relatively unchanged.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate that fluid sampled at 0 h after forming the erosion represents dermal IF before the full onset of inflammation. From 24 h onward, the sampled fluid reflects a steady state of increased permeability induced by inflammation. This technique is promising as a tool for clinically sampling substances that are freely distributed in the body and as a model for studying inflammation and vascular permeability.

PMID:
11876826
PMCID:
PMC77420
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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