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Trends Immunol. 2002 Mar;23(3):158-64.

Caveolae and caveolin in immune cells: distribution and functions.

Author information

1
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, South Parks Road, OX1 3RE, Oxford, UK. james.harris@path.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Caveolae are small, cholesterol-rich, hydrophobic membrane domains, characterized by the presence of the protein caveolin and involved in several cellular processes, including clathrin-independent endocytosis, the regulation and transport of cellular cholesterol, and signal transduction. Recently, caveolae have been identified as providing a novel route by which several pathogens are internalized by antigen-presenting cells and as centers for signal transduction. Here, we review the distribution and role of caveolae and caveolin in mammalian immune cells.

PMID:
11864845
DOI:
10.1016/s1471-4906(01)02161-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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