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Circ Res. 2002 Feb 22;90(3):284-8.

Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells participate in cerebral neovascularization after focal cerebral ischemia in the adult mouse.

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1
Department of Neurology, Henry Ford Health Sciences Center, Detroit, Mich, USA.

Abstract

We investigated whether circulating endothelial progenitor cells contribute to neovascularization after stroke. Donor bone marrow cells obtained from transgenic mice constitutively expressing beta-galactosidase transcriptionally regulated by an endothelial-specific promoter, Tie2, were injected into adult mice. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by embolic middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion and changes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured by perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), immunohistochemistry and X-gal staining were performed. Perfusion-weighted MRI demonstrated increases in CBF around the boundary of an infarct area 1 month after ischemia. Morphological and 3-dimensional image analyses revealed enlarged and thin-walled blood vessels with sprouting or intussusception at the boundary of the ischemic lesion, which closely corresponded to elevated CBF areas detected on perfusion-weighted MRI, indicating the presence of neovascularization. X-gal and double immunostaining demonstrated that Tie2-lacZ-positive cells incorporated into sites of neovascularization at the border of the infarct, and these cells exhibited an endothelial antigenic marker (von Willebrand factor). In addition, bone marrow recipient mice without ischemia showed incorporation of Tie2-lacZ-expressing cells into vessels of the choroid plexus. These data suggest that formation of new blood vessels in the adult brain after stroke is not restricted to angiogenesis but also involves vasculogenesis and that circulating endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow contribute to the vascular substructure of the choroid plexus.

PMID:
11861416
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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