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Behav Pharmacol. 2001 Dec;12(8):603-11.

Differential effects of dopamine antagonists on locomotor activity, conditioned activity and conditioned place preference induced by cocaine in rats.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, Research Service, New York Harbor VA Health Care System, New York 10010, USA. jill.adams@med.nyu.edu

Abstract

Neuronal substrates that mediate the conditioned effects of cocaine have not been well characterized. To examine dopaminergic mechanisms, three antagonists were tested for their capacity to inhibit the expression of conditioned locomotor activity and conditioned place preference in rats. Antagonists were also assessed against acute cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity for comparison. For locomotor activity conditioning, six conditioning sessions were conducted over a 10-day period. Paired rats received 10 mg/kg cocaine prior to activity sessions and saline after; unpaired controls received saline prior and cocaine after. For place preference conditioning, eight conditioning sessions were conducted over a 13-day period; rats received 10 mg/kg cocaine while restricted to one of two distinct chambers and, on alternate days, they received saline in the other. Antagonists (haloperidol, raclopride and SCH23390; 0.03-0.1 mg/kg) were given only on test days for conditioned effects. All three antagonists significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the direct stimulatory effect of cocaine. SCH23390 showed a tendency to reduce the expression of conditioned locomotor activity, and only haloperidol blocked the expression of conditioned place preference. Thus, direct and conditioned stimulant effects of cocaine were shown to be differentially sensitive to dopamine receptor blockade. Further, conditioned stimulant effects differed from conditioned reinforcing effects in this regard.

PMID:
11856897
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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