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Kidney Int. 2002 Mar;61(3):1098-114.

Mycophenolate mofetil treatment for primary glomerular diseases.

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1
Nephrology Division, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E. Monument Street, Baltimore, MD 21205-2196, USA. mchoi3@jhmi.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment of primary glomerular diseases may be unsuccessful or have potential toxicities. Therefore, we evaluated the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for empirical treatment of primary glomerulopathies.

METHODS:

Forty-six patients with biopsy-proven primary glomerulopathies received MMF for > or =3 months as adjunctive or primary treatment. Median (range) 24-hour urine protein to creatinine ratio (Up/c) and serum creatinine at the start and end of MMF therapy were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test.

RESULTS:

Overall, the median Up/c decreased from 4.7 (range <0.1, 20.3) to 1.1 (<0.1, 14.3; P < 0.001) at the end of MMF treatment with no significant change in median serum creatinine 1.3 (0.6 to 6.1) to 1.2 (0.5 to 6.5) mg/dL. Median serum albumin increased from 3.4 (1.4, 4.6) to 4.1 (1.7, 48) g/dL (P < 0.001) and the median serum cholesterol decreased from 270 (148, 795) to 220 (140, 309) mg/dL (P < 0.001) post-treatment. For those with minimal change disease, a complete steroid withdrawal was accomplished in 5/6 steroid dependent patients. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) patients had a median Up/c that decreased from 2.7 (0.1, 20.3) to 0.8 (<0.1, 8.2; P = 0.001) in 18 patients. In membranous nephropathy (MN) patients, the median Up/c decreased from 7.3 (0.1, 18.5) to 1.5 (<0.1, 14.3) (P = 0.001) in 17 patients. No significant change in median serum creatinine was detected in FSGS or MN patient groups during treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Empirical MMF therapy in the majority of patients with primary glomerulopathies was well tolerated and achieved the goals of steroid withdrawal, improvement of nephrotic syndrome, and stabilization of renal function.

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