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J Comb Chem. 2002 Jan-Feb;4(1):17-22.

High-throughput screening system for catalytic hydrogen-producing materials.

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  • 1Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5080, USA.

Abstract

A high-throughput screening system and methodology were developed for libraries of hydrogen (H(2)) producing catalytic materials. The system is based on the chemo-optical properties of WO(3), which give rise to reflectance changes in the presence of H(2). Pd-coated WO(3) sensors were synthesized and examined for their hydrogen sensitivity, wavelength-dependent reflectance, and performance in the presence of water vapor. For high-throughput screening, a polypropylene reactor block was designed and constructed to house 8 x 12 catalyst libraries deposited as thin films. When the library and reactor block are assembled together, 96 independent microreactor units are formed. A large-area Pd/WO(3) sensor film covers and seals all microreactors, forming a 96-element 2-D H(2) sensor array. As H(2) is produced differentially across the library, the reflectance changes of the Pd/WO(3) film are monitored by reflectivity sensors that scan the surface every 30 s. The time-dependent changes in reflectance indicate relative rates of H(2) production. A library of cathode electrocatalysts was synthesized from Ti, Pt, Ni, Au, Pd, Al, Ag, Ge, and mixtures thereof to demonstrate the H(2) high-throughput screening system. The results of the electrolytic screening are in agreement with expected literature trends: mixtures of Ni and samples containing Pt and Pd generated H(2) at the greatest rates, while Ge- and Ti-based materials were the least effective electrocatalysts. A mixture of 80% Al and 20% Pt was found to have the highest rate of H(2) production. This high-throughput screening system is applicable in a variety of catalytic screening applications where hydrogen is the desired product.

PMID:
11831878
[PubMed]
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