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J Acoust Soc Am. 2002 Jan;111(1 Pt 1):261-70.

Development of wide-band middle ear transmission in the Mongolian gerbil.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Neuroscience and Hugh Knowles Center, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3550, USA.

Erratum in

  • J Acoust Soc Am 2002 Jun;111(6):2941.

Abstract

Stapes vibrations were measured in deeply anesthetized adult and neonatal (ages: 14 to 20 days) Mongolian gerbils. In adult gerbils, the velocity magnitude of stapes responses to tones was approximately constant over the entire frequency range of measurements, 1 to 40 kHz. Response phases referred to pressure near the tympanic membrane varied approximately linearly as a function of increasing stimulus frequency, with a slope corresponding to a group delay of 30 micros. In neonatal gerbils, the sensitivity of stapes responses to tones was lower than in adults, especially at mid-frequencies (e.g., by about 15 dB at 10-20 kHz in gerbils aged 14 days). The input impedance of the adult gerbil cochlea, calculated from stapes vibrations and published measurements of pressure in scala vestibuli near the oval window [E. Olson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 3445-3463 (1998)], is principally dissipative at frequencies lower than 10 kHz.

CONCLUSIONS:

(a) middle-ear vibrations in adult gerbils do not limit the input to the cochlea up to at least 40 kHz, i.e., within 0.5 oct of the high-frequency cutoff of the behavioral audiogram; and (b) the results in both adult and neonatal gerbils are inconsistent with the hypothesis that mass reactance controls high-frequency ossicular vibrations and support the idea that the middle ear functions as a transmission line.

PMID:
11831800
PMCID:
PMC1868569
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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