Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Anim Health Res Rev. 2001 Dec;2(2):141-61.

Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and the bovine immune system.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Science, Center for Animal Functional Genomics, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824, USA. coussens@msu.edu

Abstract

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, a deadly intestinal ailment of ruminants. Johne's disease is of tremendous economic importance to the worldwide dairy industry, causing major losses due to reduced production and early culling of animals. A highly controversial but developing link between exposure to M. paratuberculosis and human Crohn's disease in some individuals has led to the suggestion that M. paratuberculosis is also a potential food safety concern. As with many other mycobacteria, M. paratuberculosis is exquisitely adapted to survival in the host, despite aggressive immune reactions to these organisms. One hallmark of mycobacteria, including M. paratuberculosis, is their propensity to infect macrophages. Inside the macrophage, M. paratuberculosis interferes with the maturation of the phagosome by an unknown mechanism, thereby evading the host's normal first line of defense against bacterial pathogens. The host immune system begins a series of attacks against M. paratuberculosis-infected macrophages, including the rapid deployment of activated gammadelta T cells, CD4+ T cells and cytolytic CD8+ T cells. These cells interact with the persistently infected macrophage and with each other through a complex network of cytokines and receptors. Despite these aggressive efforts to clear the infection, M. paratuberculosis persists and the constant struggle of the immune system leads to pronounced damage to the intestinal epithelial cells. Enhancing our ability to control this important and tenacious pathogen will require a deeper understanding of how M. paratuberculosis interferes with macrophage action, the cell types involved in the immune response, the cytokines these cells use to communicate, and the host genetic factors that control the response to infection.

PMID:
11831436
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center