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Surgery. 2002 Jan;131(1 Suppl):S182-9.

Living-donor liver transplantation for fulminant hepatic failure in adult patients with a left-lobe graft.

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  • 1Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, and Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Living donors are practically the only source of organs in countries where the availability of cadaveric donors is severely restricted, such as Japan. A left-lobe graft, in which one third of the liver is donated, is therefore used for adult-to-adult living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).

METHODS:

Fifteen adult patients with FHF, ranging from 22 to 59 years of age, were treated with LDLT with a left-lobe graft. Preoperative encephalopathy was grade II in 2 patients, grade III in 4 patients, and grade IV in 9 patients. The graft volume (GV) ranged from 260 to 570 mL, thus corresponding to 23% to 54% of the recipients' standard liver volume (SLV). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to their GV/SLV: a medium-size graft group (GV/SLV > or =30%; group M, n = 11) and a small-size graft group (GV/SLV <30%; group S, n = 4). The effects of GV/SLV on graft function and survival were compared. Postoperative neurologic complications were also evaluated.

RESULTS:

The donors are all doing well. Twelve (80%) of the 15 recipients are still alive, with a follow-up period of from 3 to 43 months. No statistically significant differences were observed in the postoperative serum levels of bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase, prothrombin time, or frequency of postoperative complications between the 2 groups. The graft and patient survival rates were 75% (3/4) and 75% (3/4) in group S and 73% (8/11) and 82% (9/11) in group M, respectively. All patients who survived the perioperative period recovered without any neurologic sequelae.

CONCLUSIONS:

The high success rate and low donor risk of LDLT may therefore justify its use for adult patients with FHF using a left-lobe graft.

PMID:
11821808
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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