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Transplantation. 2002 Jan 27;73(2):237-42.

Three-dimensional multislice helical computed tomography with the volume rendering technique in the detection of vascular complications after liver transplantation.

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1
Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis are common complications in liver transplant patients. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has served as the gold standard to make this diagnosis. More recently, three-dimensional helical computed tomographic arteriography (3D CTA) with maximum intensity projection and shaded surface display techniques has been compared with DSA. The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3D CTA with the volume rendering technique is a useful and accurate tool in the detection of vascular complications after liver transplantation.

METHODS:

Thirty-five consecutive liver transplant patients underwent 3D CTA with volume rendering technique. The standard of reference was DSA for 20 patients and imaging and clinical follow-up for 15 patients. Two blinded reviewers evaluated the axial and 3D CTA images in consensus.

RESULTS:

3D CTA with volume rendering technique detected 10 hepatic artery stenoses, six hepatic artery thromboses, two hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms, two splenic artery aneurysms, two portal vein stenoses, and four redundant hepatic arteries. In one case computed tomography (CT) detected a moderate hepatic artery stenosis, while conventional angiography showed a normal artery. The sensitivity of CT for detecting vascular lesions was 100%, specificity was 89% (8 of 9), accuracy was 95% (19 of 20), positive predictive value was 92% (11 of 12), and negative predictive value was 100% (8 of 8).

CONCLUSIONS:

3D CTA is a useful and accurate noninvasive technique for detection of vascular complications in liver transplant patients.

PMID:
11821737
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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