Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer. 2002 Jan 1;94(1):219-27.

Detection of genetic alterations in the p53 suppressor gene and the K-ras oncogene among different grades of dysplasia in patients with colorectal adenomas.

Author information

1
Second Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although it is believed that p53 suppressor gene mutations, compared with mutations in the K-ras oncogene, occur at a later stage of colorectal tumorigenesis, the distribution of these genetic alterations at an early stage remains poorly characterized.

METHODS:

The authors analyzed the immunoreactivity for p53 protein (p53 protein expression), which reflects the functionally altered p53 gene, and K-ras mutations at codons 12 in 68 colorectal adenomas with both low-grade and high-grade dysplasia obtained from 62 patients.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of p53 positive immunostaining was significantly greater compared with the prevalence of K-ras mutations both in low-grade dysplasia and in high-grade dysplasia. Twenty-two adenomas (32.3%) showed positive immunostaining for p53 protein in high-grade dysplasia and also were positive for p53 in surrounding low-grade dysplastic tissues; 20 adenomas (29.4%) showed positive immunostaining for p53 protein in high-grade dysplasia and were negative for p53 in surrounding low-grade dysplastic tissues; 8 adenomas (11.7%) showed negative immunostaining for p53 protein in high-grade dysplasia and were positive for p53 in surrounding low-grade dysplastic tissues; and 18 adenomas (26.4%) showed negative immunostaining for p53 protein in both high-grade dysplasia and in surrounding low-grade dysplastic tissues. On the whole, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was seen in the frequency of p53 positive immunostaining between low-grade dysplasia and high-grade dysplasia (44.1% and 61.8%, respectively) but not in that of K-ras mutations (20.3% and 23.4%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study suggest that mutation of the p53 suppressor gene occurs earlier in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence than K-ras mutation, providing a clue for further understanding of the role of the p53 gene in the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis.

PMID:
11815980
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.10198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center