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Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Feb 15;34(4):499-503. Epub 2002 Jan 7.

Nosocomial antibiotic resistance in multiple gram-negative species: experience at one hospital with squeezing the resistance balloon at multiple sites.

Author information

1
Infectious Disease Section, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, NY, 11355, USA. jjr9002@nyp.org

Abstract

Increased use of antibiotics has led to the isolation of multidrug-resistant bacteria, especially in intensive care units and long-term care facilities. Resistance in specific gram-negative bacteria, including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is of great concern, because a growing number of reports have documented mechanisms whereby these microorganisms have become resistant to all available antibacterial agents used in therapy. Reduction in the selection of these multidrug-resistant bacteria can be accomplished by a combination of several strategies. These include having an understanding of the genetics of both innate and acquired characteristics of bacteria; knowing resistance potentials for specific antibacterials; monitoring resistance trends in bacteria designated as problematic organisms within a particular institution on a routine basis; modifying antibiotic formularies when and where needed; creating institutional education programs; and enforcing strict infection-control practices. Strategies appropriate for primary prevention of nosocomial resistance may differ from those required for control of existing epidemic or endemic resistance.

PMID:
11797177
DOI:
10.1086/338639
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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