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Peptides. 2001 Nov;22(11):1693-711.

A review of the biological properties and clinical implications of adrenomedullin and proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), hypotensive and vasodilating peptides.

Author information

1
The First Department of Internal Medicine, Miyazaki Medical College, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, 889-1692, Miyazaki, Japan. keto@post.miyazaki-med.ac.jp

Abstract

Adrenomedullin (AM), identified from pheochromocytoma and having 52 amino acids, elicits a long-lasting vasodilatation and diuresis. AM is mainly mediated by the intracellular adenylate cyclase coupled with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and nitric oxide (NO) -cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway through its specific receptor. The calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLCR) and receptor-activity modifying protein (RAMP) 2 or RAMP3 models have been proposed as the candidate receptor. AM is produced mainly in cardiovascular tissues in response to stimuli such as shear stress and stretch, hormonal factors and cytokines. Recently established AM knockout mice lines revealed that AM is essential for development of vitelline vessels of embryo. Plasma AM levels elevate in cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, hypertension and septic shock, where AM may play protective roles through its characteristic biological activities. Human AM gene delivery improves hypertension, renal function, cardiac hypertrophy and nephrosclerosis in the hypertensive rats. AM decreases cardiac preload and afterload and improves cardiac contractility and diuresis in patients with heart failure and hypertension. Advances in gene engineering and receptor studies may contribute to further understandings of biological implication and therapeutic availability of AM.

PMID:
11754955
DOI:
10.1016/s0196-9781(01)00513-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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