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Eur J Cancer. 2002 Jan;38(1):75-81.

Clinical features of peripheral T-cell lymphomas in 78 patients diagnosed according to the Revised European-American lymphoma (REAL) classification.

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1
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) according to the Revised European-American Lymphoma (REAL) classification. From 1994 to 1999, 78 patients were diagnosed with PTCLs, excluding cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The distribution of the histological subgroups were: PTCL unspecified (PTCL-U), 40%; angiocentric lymphoma, 32%; anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), 17%; angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILD), 6%; intestinal T-cell lymphoma, 3%; and panniculitic T-cell lymphoma, 3%. Patients with angiocentric lymphoma presented with favourable prognostic factors, whereas those with AILD presented with unfavourable prognostic factors. Most patients were treated with doxorubicin-containing combination chemotherapy (with or without radiation therapy). The overall complete remission rate was 61.2% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 48.5-72.8%) and the 5-year probability of failure-free survival was 33.5%. Median survival of all patients was 45 months (range 0-64+ months) and the 5-year probability of survival was 36.2%. In the multivariate analysis, only the International Prognosis Index (IPI) was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P<0.01). Taken together, the proportion of angiocentric lymphoma in this study was higher than that in the studies of Western countries. PTCL responds poorly to treatment with low survival rates and the IPI is a useful prognostic factor for PTCL.

PMID:
11750843
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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