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Blood. 1975 Nov;46(5):705-11.

Use of cell separation and short-term culture techniques to study erythroid cell development.

Abstract

Cell populations highly enriched for the different stages of erythroid cell maturation were obtained by three sequential operations: harvesting of erythroid cells after induction of erythroid hyperplasia in the spleens of mice, elimination of the more mature erythrocytes by immunologic techniques, and separation of the residual nucleated erythroid cells as a function of size by the velocity sedimentation technique. The resulting cell fractions were studied both directly and after overnight incubation in the presence or absence of erythropoietin. In short-term culture, erythropoietin stimulated proliferation of pronormoblasts and basophilic normoblasts but probably not cells at later stages of differentiation. Erythropoietin also appeared to recruit increased numbers of pronormoblasts. In this experimental system, erythroid cell differentiation was able to proceed in the absence of erythropoietin, but without proliferation of these early erythroid cells. These techniques have provided a model system for the study of erythroid cells at different stages of maturation isolated from a uniform source at one point in time. The morphologic observations indicated that erythropoietin stimulates erythroid cell proliferation at several early stages of the maturation pathway.

PMID:
1174706
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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