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Am J Med Genet. 2001 Nov 15;104(1):86-92.

Possible relationship between the van der Woude syndrome (vWS) locus and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P).

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1
Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire, Hôpital d'Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 26 Avenue du Docteur Arnold-Necker, 75571 Paris Cedex 12, France. biochimie.trousseau@trs.ap-hop-paris.fr

Abstract

Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is one of the most common congenital malformations in humans occurring with a birth prevalence of approximately 1:1,000. CL/P may be part of a defined syndrome, sequence or association, although most individual or familial cases present as an isolated (nonsyndromic) malformation (NSCL/P). Inheritance is generally regarded as multigenic although, in some families, NSCL/P seemingly segregates as a monogenic trait. On the other hand, van der Woude syndrome (vWS) is a rare autosomal dominant with cardinal features of lower-lip pits (LLP) and CL/P or cleft palate (alone). Since none of these traits is present in all mutation carriers, some individual or familial vWS cases, especially those lacking LLP, are indiscernible from NSCL/P, raising the question whether allelic variation at the vWS locus could underlie NSCL/P. This question was addressed using parametric linkage (LOD score) analysis in 21 multiplex NSCL/P families based on a tightly linked microsatellite marker (D1S3753), and nonparametric analysis using the transmission/disequilibrium test (GTDT) in 106 NSCL/P triads and selecting markers D1S205, D1S491, and D1S3753. No evidence for linkage of NSCL/P to vWS was found on the 21 families using the LOD score approach. In contrast, TDT yielded a significant P value of 0.04 for D1S205, supporting involvement of vWS in NSCL/P in a complex, modifying/polygenic manner rather than as a monogenic/major disease locus.

PMID:
11746036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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