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Br J Pharmacol. 2001 Dec;134(8):1601-8.

Saint John's wort: an in vitro analysis of P-glycoprotein induction due to extended exposure.

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1
Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, MA 02111, USA.

Abstract

1. Chronic use of Saint John's wort (SJW) has been shown to lower the bioavailability for a variety of co-administered drugs including indinavir, cyclosporin, and digoxin. Decreases in intestinal absorption through induction of the multidrug resistance transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), may explain decreased bioavailability. 2. The present study characterized the response of P-gp to chronic and acute exposure of SJW and hypericin (HYP, a presumed active moiety within SJW) in an in vitro system. Experiments were performed with 3 to 300 microg ml(-1) of methanol-extracted SJW and 0.03 to 3 microM HYP, representing low to high estimates of intestinal concentrations. 3. In induction experiments, LS-180 intestinal carcinoma cells were exposed for 3 days to SJW, HYP, vehicle or a positive control (ritonavir). P-gp was quantified using Western blot analysis. P-gp expression was strongly induced by SJW (400% increase at 300 microg ml(-1)) and by HYP (700% at 3 microM) in a dose-dependent fashion. Cells chronically treated with SJW had decreased accumulation of rhodamine 123, a P-gp substrate, that was reversed with acute verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Fluorescence microscopy of intact cells validated these findings. In Caco-2 cell monolayers, SJW and HYP caused moderate inhibition of P-gp-attributed transport at the maximum concentrations tested. 4. SJW and HYP significantly induced P-gp expression at low, clinically relevant concentrations. Similar effects occurring in vivo may explain the decreased bioavailability of P-gp substrate drugs when co-administered with SJW.

PMID:
11739235
PMCID:
PMC1572891
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjp.0704399
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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