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Diabetes Care. 2001 Dec;24(12):2023-9.

Plasma glucose levels throughout the day and HbA(1c) interrelationships in type 2 diabetes: implications for treatment and monitoring of metabolic control.

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1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease, University of Verona Medical School, Verona, Italy. enbonor@tin.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the extent of plasma glucose excursions with meals, the relations between plasma glucose levels at different times of the day, and the relations between the latter and HbA(1c) in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic subjects.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Daily glucose profiles were assessed in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Outpatients at the diabetes clinic (n = 371; one daily plasma glucose profile) and at home (n = 30; five daily blood glucose profiles over 1 month) as well as inpatients (n = 455; profile of plasma glucose on the day of admission) were examined. Subjects had plasma/blood glucose assessment before and 2-3 h after breakfast, lunch, and dinner. HbA(1c) was also measured.

RESULTS:

After the meals many subjects had glucose levels >8.9 mmol/l (160 mg/dl) and/or glucose excursions >2.2 mmol/l (40 mg/dl). This was also often found when HbA(1c) was satisfactory (<7%). The coefficients of simple correlation among plasma/blood glucose at different times of the day ranged from 0.52 to 0.88. Correlations between HbA(1c) and plasma/blood glucose at different times of the day ranged from 0.44 to 0.67. The strongest correlation was between HbA(1c) and mean daily glucose (r = 0.57-0.69). Multiple regression analyses showed that premeal but not postmeal plasma/blood glucose levels were independent predictors of HbA(1c).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that 1) the majority of non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients have exaggerated plasma/blood glucose excursions with meals, and many of them have higher-than-recommended glucose concentrations 2 h after the meals; 2) plasma/blood glucose levels throughout the day are not as strongly interrelated as one might believe; and 3) HbA(1c) is more related to preprandial than postprandial plasma/blood glucose levels. These findings have potential implications for treatment and monitoring of metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
11723077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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