Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Nov;185(5):1130-6.

Clinical significance of intra-amniotic inflammation in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and clinical significance of intraamniotic inflammation in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes.

STUDY DESIGN:

Amniocentesis was performed in 206 patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Amniotic fluid was cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and mycoplasmas. The diagnosis of intraamniotic inflammation was made in patients with a negative amniotic fluid culture on the basis of amniotic fluid concentrations of interleukin-6 (>2.6 ng/mL, derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis). Statistical analysis was conducted with contingency tables and survival techniques.

RESULTS:

Intra-amniotic inflammation (negative amniotic fluid culture but elevated amniotic fluid interleukin-6) was more common than intra-amniotic infection (positive amniotic fluid culture regardless of amniotic fluid interleukin-6 concentration; 21% [44/206 women] vs 10% [21/206 women]; P <.001). The amniocentesisto-delivery interval was significantly shorter in patients with intra-amniotic inflammation than in patients with a negative culture and without an inflammation (median, 20 hours [range, 0.1-2328 hours] vs median, 701 hours [range, 0.1-3252 hours], respectively; P <.0001). Spontaneous preterm delivery of <37 weeks was more frequent in patients with intra-amniotic inflammation than in those with a negative culture and without inflammation (98% vs 35%; P <.001). Patients with intra-amniotic inflammation had a significantly higher rate of adverse outcome than patients with a negative culture and without intra-amniotic inflammation. Adverse outcomes included clinical and histologic chorioamnionitis, funisitis, early preterm birth, and significant neonatal morbidity. There were no significant differences in the rate of adverse outcomes between patients with a negative culture but with intra-amniotic inflammation and patients with intra-amniotic infection (positive culture regardless of amniotic fluid interleukin-6 concentration).

CONCLUSION:

Intra-amniotic inflammation/infection complicates one third of the patients with preterm labor (32%; 65/206 women), and its presence is a risk factor for adverse outcome. The outcome of patients with microbiologically proven intra-amniotic infection is similar to that of patients with intra-amniotic inflammation and a negative amniotic fluid culture. We propose that the treatment of patients in preterm labor be based on the operational diagnosis of intra-amniotic inflammation rather than the diagnosis of intra-amniotic infection because the latter diagnosis cannot be undertaken rapidly.

PMID:
11717646
DOI:
10.1067/mob.2001.117680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center