Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BMC Dermatol. 2001;1:6. Epub 2001 Oct 25.

Protection against ultraviolet radiation by commercial summer clothing: need for standardised testing and labelling.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany. t.gambichler@derma.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of clothing as a means of sun protection has been recommended in recent education campaigns. Contrary to popular opinion, however, some fabrics provide insufficient ultraviolet (UV) protection.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We investigated 236 apparel textiles of the spring/summer collections 2000 and 2001. In accordance with the forthcoming European standard the UV protection factor (UPF) of the fabrics was determined spectrophotometrically.

RESULTS:

Seventy-eight (33%) fabrics had UPF < 15, 45 (19%) had UPF = or > 15 and < 30, and 113 (48%) had UPF = or > 30 (30+). More than 70% of the wool, polyester, and fabric blends, and only less than 30% of the cotton, linen, and viscose fabrics had UPF values of 30+. Fabrics with black, navy-blue, white, green, or beige colours provided most frequently UPF values of 30+.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is difficult for the sun-aware consumer to choose the 'right' garment, with a third of summer clothing providing insufficient UV protection and only half of the fabrics having UPF 30+, the UPF recommended by the European standard. Therefore, apparel summer fabrics should be measured and labelled in accordance with a standard document.

PMID:
11710968
PMCID:
PMC59842
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center