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Structure. 2001 Nov;9(11):1095-106.

Structure of Thermotoga maritima stationary phase survival protein SurE: a novel acid phosphatase.

Author information

  • 1Biosciences Division and Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 202, Argonne, IL 60439, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase sigma subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants.

RESULTS:

The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 A. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5-6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and intersubunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability.

CONCLUSIONS:

The structure of SurE provided information about the protein's fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

PMID:
11709173
PMCID:
PMC2792002
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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