Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Ultrasound. 2001 Dec;14(2-3):121-8.

Correlation of abdominal fat accumulation and liver steatosis: importance of ultrasonographic and anthropometric measurements.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, Radiodiagnostic, Pamukkale University, doktorlar cad. 20100, Denizli, Turkey. nuransabir@hotmail.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study has two objectives: (1) using ultrasound (US) as a tool for measuring subcutaneous (S) and intra-abdominal; preperitoneal (P) and visceral (V) fat thickness. (2) Assessing the relationship between selected anthropometrical variables and US-measured S, P and V fat also evaluating the contribution of abdominal fat accumulation in development of liver steatosis.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

Sixty-eight obese patients (aged 43.9+/-9.3 years) and 40 non-obese subjects (aged 34.03+/-9.0 years) were recruited to this study. Height, weight (W), waist (WC) and hip circumferences were measured. Body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. A linear-array probe (7.5 MHz) was used to measure S and P. A convex-array probe (3.5 MHz) was used for measuring V and assessing liver fatty infiltration.

RESULTS:

In 45 (66%) patients, there were diffuse liver fatty changes. Liver steatosis showed significant correlation with V (r=0.57), P (r=0.38) and S (r=0.37). It also correlated with W (r=0.52), BMI (r=0.6), WC (r=0.45) (P<0.0001). V positively correlated with BMI (r=0.62), W (r=0.55), WC (r=0.52) and WHR (r=0.33). P correlated with WC (r=0.29), WHR (r=0.36) and W (r=0.34), but not with BMI, height and age. A significant correlation was found between S and BMI (r=0.73), W (r=0.65), and WC (r=0.57) (P<0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

Obese patients showed thicker S, P, and V. Liver steatosis correlates significantly with both anthropometrical data; BMI, WHR, WC, and W, and with abdominal V, P, and S fat. V fat can be used as a good predictor for the possibility of different metabolic disorders and liver disturbances as steastosis.

PMID:
11704429
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center