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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2001 Nov;122(5):879-82.

Experience with the Norwood procedure without circulatory arrest.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Surgery, Fukuoka Children's Hospital, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated a new cardiopulmonary bypass technique that allowed complete avoidance of circulatory arrest and deep hypothermia in the Norwood procedure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

METHODS:

A total of 10 patients were included in this study. The arterial line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit was divided in two in a Y shape; one branch was used for cerebral perfusion through the innominate artery and the other for lower body perfusion through the cannula inserted into the descending thoracic aorta. Moderate hypothermia (29 degrees C-31 degrees C rectal temperature) and high pump flow (150-180 mL. kg(-1). min(-1)) were used. A valveless conduit between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery was used in 6 patients as an alternative pulmonary blood source to a conventional Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 4).

RESULTS:

Circulatory arrest was completely avoided throughout the operation in all cases, and no complications from the new cardiopulmonary bypass technique were seen. Early deaths occurred in 3 cases. Neurologic deficits were not seen among the survivors, and the postoperative course was stable and uneventful, including satisfactory renal function.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Norwood procedure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome was successfully accomplished with complete avoidance of circulatory arrest by means of cerebral perfusion through the innominate artery combined with cannulation of the descending aorta. A conduit between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery seems an excellent alternative pulmonary blood source, although right ventricular function needs to be carefully monitored.

PMID:
11689791
DOI:
10.1067/mtc.2001.116948
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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