Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Neurosci. 2001 Nov;4(11):1146-50.

Disentangling signal from noise in visual contrast discrimination.

Author information

1
Laboratoire de Psychologie Expérimentale, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and René Descartes University, 71 Avenue Edouard Vaillant, 92774 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. gorea@psycho.univ-paris5.fr

Abstract

Human ability to detect stimulus changes (Delta C) decreases with increasing reference level (C). Because detection performance reflects the signal-to-noise ratio within the relevant sensory brain module, this behavior can be accounted for in two extreme ways: first, the internal response change Delta R evoked by a constant Delta C decreases with C (that is, the transducer R = f(C) displays a compressive nonlinearity), whereas the internal noise is independent of R; second, Delta R is constant with C but the noise level increases with R. A newly discovered constraint on human decision-making helps solve this century-old problem: in a detection task where multiple changes occur with equal probabilities, observers use a unique response criterion to decide whether a change has occurred. For contrast discrimination, our results supported the first account above: human performance was limited by the contrast transducer nonlinearity and an almost constant noise.

PMID:
11687818
DOI:
10.1038/nn741
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center